Brooks & Dunn scored one of their biggest hits with "Boot Scootin' Boogie," but they actually weren't the first ones to record it.

Ronnie Dunn wrote "Boot Scootin' Boogie" before he teamed up with Kix Brooks, when he was still struggling to break through as an artist. But Asleep at the Wheel were actually first to cut it on their Keepin' Me Up Nights album in 1990. Their version is very different from the country rock treatment Brooks & Dunn would give it when they recorded it for their debut album, Brand New Man, which they released in 1991 via Arista Nashville. Click on the video above to hear the rollicking swing arrangement Asleep at the Wheel brought to "Boot Scootin' Boogie."

Brooks & Dunn released "Boot Scootin' Boogie" as the fourth single from Brand New Man, and it gave them their fourth consecutive No. 1 hit from that project, following "Brand New Man," "My Next Broken Heart" and "Neon Moon." The album's fifth single, "Lost and Found," reached No. 6, and Brand New Man was certified 6X platinum for selling six million copies, launching Brooks & Dunn into a superstar career that would continue unabated until their breakup in 2009.

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The song was written as an ode to Texas country dance club culture, and although Asleep at the Wheel's version was not released as a single, a choreographer named Bill Bader heard it and came up with an official line dance that centers around the song.  When Brooks & Dunn's rendition of "Boot Scootin Boogie" became a massive hit, it helped to reinvigorate the line dance craze that had started in the wake of Urban Cowboy in 1980, and the line dance that accompanies it is still popular in country dance clubs today.

It's also been used as the basis for a number of other popular dances. The dance is so ubiquitous worldwide that is was used to set a series of official Guinness World Records for the World's Largest Line Dance in Australia in 1996, '97, '98, '99 and again in 2000.

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